Tag Archive | "South Carolina"

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Doing D.C.

Posted on 10 April 2011 by Editor

Originally posted 2010-05-19 21:29:08. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Washington D.C.

by Nancy Morgan
RightBias.com
May 18, 2010


If you’re one of the unfortunate Americans that live in fly-over country, I have bad news for you. Our nation’s capitol is now pretty much off-limits to you.

Last week I had business in Washington, D.C. and planned a few extra days to re-acquaint myself with our nation’s history. It turned out to be the week from hell.

My first mistake was driving my SUV. The beltway encircling D.C. resembles a scene from Dante’s Inferno. Fellow drivers inside the beltway were just plain rude. All of them. As a result of being unable to change lanes, I missed my exit and spent the next two hours wandering narrow streets rife with ‘No Left Turn’ and ‘One Way’ signs. I started getting a bit anxious.

I finally made it to my hotel, whereupon I found that there were no smoking rooms available, despite my specific reservation. I figured if I’m spending $300.00 for a room, plus an extra $30.00 for my car, I should be able to do what I want. Not so. Smoking in my room would incur a $300.00 fine.

I logged onto the Internet and found that there were no rooms available anywhere in D.C. Hotel rooms cost an average of $350.00 per night. Quite affordable if the government or lobbying firms foot the bill, but quite out of my league. Alas.

Having decided to shorten my stay, I ventured out the next day to get in as much sightseeing as I could. I quickly found myself wandering in a sea of bureaucrats. I was awed to be in the presence of so many important people (in DC, everyone is, or acts, important). The majority of them had furrowed brows as if the weight of the world was on their shoulders. And they were all focused intensely, on themselves. I was invisible.

D.C. is a beautiful city. Our monuments are awe-inspiring and the sense of history is overwhelming. Unfortunately, the culture in D.C. is not welcoming to regular Americans. Tourists are merely tolerated, unless they’re somebody.

D.C. has been taken over by those who seek power and influence. It has a very clear social hierarchy, as do most cities. Unless you’re rich, famous, powerful or an insider, you’re no-one. Just the poor sucker whose taxes pay for it. What sets this city apart, however, is that they make absolutely no effort to hide it. Egos have replaced good manners.

Tourists are barely tolerated and largely unacknowledged. The only smiles I received were from fellow diners as I committed the social sin of giving thanks to God for the meal I was about to receive. And those smiles were condescending sneers.

The city itself is imploding. The infrastructure is falling apart. Traffic is a nightmare, parking is non-existent and hotel accommodations are available only to those willing to spend their life savings. D.C. is no longer for the people. Its for power players jockeying to get close to the seat of power. The power culture is toxic and infectious.

As a conservative, I seldom criticize something without offering a solution. Here’s what I would suggest as a sure fire way to remake our nation’s capitol back into the people’s capitol.

Since Obama is into redistribution, I suggest we redistribute D.C. With the exception of the White House, Supreme Court and Congress, how about we take all the government agencies and parcel them out to the states. Hey, South Carolina would get a much needed shot in the economic arm if say, the CBO and the FDA moved here from D.C.

Other agencies like the FDA, the IRS, the CIA, etc. would immediately achieve tremendous cost savings by relocating their headquarters to fly-over country. Thus freeing up buildings that could be used to house people like myself who want to visit D.C. Call it affirmative action for tourists.

The benefits of redistributing D.C. to the states are enormous. The immediate results of this plan would mean thousands of government bureaucrats, instead of spending all their time jockeying to be close to the seat of power, might just be reduced to actually reading the bills they keep churning out.

Hey, the bureaucrats would even have to live under the rules they are imposing on everyone else. They would also be exposed to ‘diverse’ cultures (as in ‘outside the beltway’) with a good chance of adopting some cultural traits from their fellows. Traits like good manners, consideration for others and other multi-American traits.

Until and unless we’re successful in redistributing the power in D.C., I’m going to keep renewing my travel alert against travel to D.C. to all residents of flyover country. I suggest instead that you vacation in South Carolina, where residents smile naturally and people are the way they’re supposed to be. Besides that, we’ve got tons of parking, affordable hotels and a refreshing lack of very important people.


Nancy Morgan is a columnist and news editor for conservative news site RightBias.com
She lives in South Carolina

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Why I Left California

Posted on 10 April 2011 by Editor

Originally posted 2010-11-14 21:11:29. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

by Nancy Morgan
RightBias.com
November 8, 2010

After living in California for 33 years, I finally decided to leave. I sold my business and my home and relocated to South Carolina.

I moved to California when I was 17. Like most of my fellow residents, I was busy living my life. I gave very little thought to politics, assuming that politicians knew best how to run the state. I wasn’t even aware of the difference between Republicans and Democrats. I would always vote, but with 20/20 hindsight, I see how my votes were manipulated and influenced by the overwhelmingly liberal media.

Until age 36, I pretty much followed the party line, believing what I saw on the news and read in the papers. I figured the ‘experts’ knew better than I, and was relieved not to have to form my own opinions. I relied on group thought, which is, or was, extremely pervasive in the Los Angeles area.

I remember hearing a talk show host describe how a school board in Torrance was successful in defeating a Christian candidate and remember feeling glad that there were others out there working to keep radical influences away from our children. I never questioned the premise that Christians were considered radical.

I adopted as fact the headlines I saw on the news. I was busy living my life. It wasn’t until 1992 that I became aware that I had only been exposed to one side of the story. I was not even aware that there was a conservative point of view.

In 1992, Ross Perot was on TV holding up a toilet seat. Perot said the Air Force had paid something like $700.00 for that toilet seat. He then said the 5 words that changed my life forever. “And this is public knowledge.”

Huh? I decided to check out his claim. And I found that, yes, that information was public knowledge. Only problem was, the media in Los Angeles had never reported it. Just as they never reported any other than the liberal point of view.

After some searching, I latched onto National Review Magazine and the Washington Times. What I found when reading those publications made my blood boil. There was a whole school of thought out there that I had never been exposed to. The conservative point of view. And I found I agreed with their premises.

No matter how thin the pancake, there are always two sides. For 22 years, I had only been exposed to one side of the story. And I came to find that side I had been exposed to was far different from what I had been led to believe. Shame on me.

I assumed that my husband, family and friends would be just as angry as I when I informed them of my new insights. I quickly found out that, then, as now, they were totally opposed to hearing any facts that challenged their long held views.

Long story short, I became a pariah. Conservative views were simply not tolerated back in the 90’s in Los Angeles. When I persisted in voicing my opinions, most of my relationships suffered. My husband left me and my family made clear that there must be something wrong with me. I got tired of the raised eyebrows and condescending smiles. I realized nothing I said would penetrate. The frustration drove me to anger, which pretty much nixed any chance I had of influencing others to my new point of view.

For 8 years, the only place I could be myself was when I covered conservative gatherings. Finally, a stray news item had a catalytic effect on me. I found that 7th graders in San Francisco were being taught how to fist. (A homosexual practice – enough said) Under the guise of teaching tolerance, my tax dollars were being used to fund a week-end ‘health’ fair that brainwashed children into believing that the gay lifestyle was normal – merely a lifestyle choice. That was the last straw.

I took off on a cross country trip, seeking a place where I could be myself and where my tax dollars wouldn’t be continually funding policies with which I fundamentally disagreed. I finally decided on South Carolina. I sold my business and home and left California for good.

I miss many things about California. But after last Tuesday’s election, I realize that living in California is no longer an option for me.

The blatant media malfeasance, the lack of intellectual diversity and the continuing reign of liberal politicians guarantees that California will remain mired in failed liberal policies for the foreseeable future. And I will not condone paying the taxes the state insists upon when I know the money will be spent on promoting a largely discredited liberal agenda. That’s not the America I want to live in.

Since 2002, several of my friends have also left California for good. Studies show that the only increase in population in California right now are immigrants. Which begs the question: Who will be paying the taxes required to fund the utopian agenda put in place by far-left liberals? And how long can California continue to ignore reality before the whole state comes crashing down?

Maybe I’m wrong. Maybe it’s possible Governor-elect Moonbeam can solve the state’s fiscal crisis. Just because he’s a lifetime member of the far left doesn’t mean he can’t change his stripes and usher in the reforms California so desperately needs. By golly, I just saw a pig fly right by my window!


Nancy Morgan is a columnist and news editor for conservative news site RightBias.com

Article posted with the author’s permission.

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I Discriminate

Posted on 10 April 2011 by Editor

Originally posted 2010-07-14 20:41:56. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

by Nancy Morgan
RightBias.com
July 13, 2010


I discriminate. All the time. When I see black teenagers with gang tats coming towards me, I’ll move to the other side of the street. Now if they were carrying Bibles, I might not be as worried.

If I play backgammon with an Asian, I use different tactics than I would with say, an Irishman. Experience has taught me that Asians excel in math and I adopt my tactics accordingly.

If I am going to pick a winner on Dancing With Stars, I’ll pick the black couple, hands down. As a rule, blacks just dance better than whites. (Can I say that?)

If I need to hire someone to do yard work, I’ll choose a Mexican laborer over a welfare recipient any day. Experience has taught me that Mexicans, both legal and illegal, have a better work ethic than do those who rely on welfare.

Not a day goes by that I don’t discriminate. The left calls this racism. I call it survival.

To ignore years of life experience in favor of government mandated political correctness is the height of folly. No-one has the right to legislate morality. And no-one has the right to demand that I believe the leftists’ mantra that all cultures and people are equal. That’s just plain stupid.

People in the U.S. are born equal. The decisions they make throughout their lives, however, result in far different outcomes. Some decide to spend their lives pursuing a free lunch, while some decide to become productive members of society. In my book, that means the one who contributes to society has more value than the one that doesn’t. They are not equal.

The American culture beats the Arab culture hands down. At least for females. And the culture in my little neighborhood in Murrells Inlet most assuredly trumps the culture in most inner cities. By any measure. That’s just reality.

I personally don’t care for deadbeats. I choose not to associate with them. I also don’t care to associate with feminists, global warming idiots and race baiters. Experience has taught me that I just don’t do well when confronted with useful idiots. It’s a choice I choose to make. It’s discrimination.

For leftists to insist that I ignore cultural and personal differences, to insist that I adhere to their ever-changing version of reality, is akin to asking me to believe that white is black. America is still based on individual freedom. That includes the freedom to decide for myself. It’s called "having an opinion."

Why should I agree to suspend my own judgement in favor of a mealy-mouthed platitude whose main purpose is to confer faux moral superiority on any useful idiot who opts to parrott the politically correct soundbite of the day?

Discrimination is a survival tool. It’s wisdom, not discrimination, to learn from past experiences. And to apply that knowledge in everyday choices.

Since I acknowledge that there are differences between different races, I guess I’m also a racist. Believe it or not, we all are. Hey, I wouldn’t put an Asian with a mathematics degree on the basketball court. But according to the left, that means I am "profiling." Color me guilty.

I admit it. I profile people based on their race and appearance.

Somehow, it just doesn’t sink in that a young skinhead sporting a Nazi tattoo is the equal of say, Thomas Sowell. Based on the skinhead’s appearance, I form conclusions about him. The conclusions may be wrong, but I’m not going to bet on it. And I’m not going to invite to dinner the black guy I saw on TV dressed in military gear telling everyone to kill white babies. Life experience has taught me that he is an ignorant racist who banks on our new "culture of equality" to shield him from being held accountable for his hateful rhetoric. In my opinion, he’s just trash.

When I see an obese 29 year-old mother of six living on welfare, I make assumptions. When I see a Christian man with two jobs and six children, I also make assumptions. I choose not to believe that the obese mother is a victim of a male dominated patriarchal society. I choose to, gasp, judge her.

She was born with the same rights as I, and she, like everyone else past the age of 20, is a product of the choices they have made. Choices that all of us are picking up the tab for. (How equal is that?)

The mantra that all people and cultures are equal is a dangerous fallacy. Throughout history, countries that are free are not equal, and countries that are equal are not free. Again, it comes down to choice. I choose to live in a country where I am free to discriminate and judge people myself instead of being forced to adhere to the leftist illusion that we’re all equal. That’s just plain stupid. And dangerous.


Nancy Morgan is a clumnist and news editor for conservative news site RightBias.com
She lives in South Carolina.

Published with the author’s permission.

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Why I Became a Conservative

Posted on 10 April 2011 by Editor

Originally posted 2009-10-07 21:50:24. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

by Nancy Morgan
RightBias.com
October 1, 2009
 
 
In early 1992, I heard five words that were to drastically alter the course of my life. H. Ross Perot was on TV. He held up a toilet seat and said “The government paid $700.00 for this toilet seat.” He then stated, “And this is public knowledge.” Huh?
 
Perot then went on to outline more fascinating nuggets of information I had absolutely no knowledge of. He pulled out charts and graphs and proceeded to inform me of a world of facts to which I had never been exposed.
 
Having long prided myself on being informed, I decided to educate myself on all this “public knowledge.” What I found appalled and angered me. And changed my life forever.
 
For the first time in my life, I picked up a National Review magazine and started reading. I moved on to the Washington Times, American Spectator and various other conservative publications I had never been aware of before. The more I read, the angrier I got.
 
I had always assumed that if something was on TV or in the newspapers, it was correct. I always assumed that our elected officials knew better than I how to address the problems of our nation. I always assumed that my friends’ opinions were more valid and informed than mine. I was 39 years old and just finding out how incredibly naive I was.
 
Having lived in Los Angeles since my teens, I was never exposed to any other than the liberal point of view. I made the mistake of assuming it was the only valid view, just as millions of other Americans still do.
 
I had adopted the views of the herd, assuming that since everyone felt that way, it was the right way to feel. Besides, I was too busy living my life to spend the time necessary to form my own views independently of my peers. I had taken the easy way out, accepting and spouting the currently fashionable talking points as my own. And patting myself on the back for being informed and knowledgeable. Ouch.
 
After reveling in government approved and politically correct self esteem for so many years, the descent into humility was painful. How naive was I to have blindly accepted so many premises without question? How ignorant was I to have advocated certain positions based on face value and cheap sound bites? How stupid was I to have allowed others to manipulate and exploit my ignorance? The answer: Pretty darn stupid.

The anger I felt stemmed from finally realizing that no matter how thin the pancake, there are always two sides. And I had only been exposed to one. That didn’t set right. I felt I had been lied to my whole life. I responded by making it my mission to inform everyone I knew of the astonishing revelations I was finding on a daily basis. That was another big mistake.
 
I assumed everyone in my world would be just as appalled as I to find that things were not as they seemed. I studied, I amassed facts, I quoted sources, and I lectured. And I got yet another lesson in humility. Instead of applauding my efforts, my family, my friends, my husband and my co-workers sent me to the woodshed.
 
I soon realized that my facts took a back seat to their emotions. I found that the conservative point of view had been judged invalid years before I became aware of it. The case was already closed. Hadn’t I heard? 
 
I persisted. “But how can you dispute these facts?” I railed. I quickly found out. Liberals demolished my factual arguments by demonizing me, thus relieving themselves of the need to entertain or debate any facts that challenged their world view.
 
Being stubborn as well as stupid, I continued my quest to inform one and all of the error of their way of thinking. With predictable results. Soon, everyone in my world informed me that there must be something wrong with me. Eventually, I started to believe them, and finally decided to keep my opinions to myself.
 
I tried. For three years, I consciously tried to keep my mouth shut. I tried to go along to get along. I failed. Long story short: I lost my husband. I no longer speak with my feminist mother and my liberal siblings.
Having continued to read voraciously about all things conservative, I was exposed to the role Christianity played in our country’s founding. After further research and soul searching, I eventually became a Christian. Learning to have faith in Christ enabled me to have faith in myself – and faith in my traditional and conservative views.
 
Eight years after my epiphany, and 33 years after moving to Los Angeles, I sold my home and business. I said good-bye to the few friends and family I still had, and left Los Angeles for good. I knew there had to be a place in the world where I could be myself without ticking everyone off.
 
After a lot of searching, I finally found it. Its called Murrells Inlet, South Carolina. Here in this little fishing village, I have found peace and happiness. I can identify myself as a conservative without having to go stand in the corner. Here in South Carolina, I am normal. I am also the luckiest of women.
 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 
Nancy Morgan is a columnist and news editor for RightBias.com
She lives in South Carolina
  

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